5 Reasons Why You Should Keep Geotagging

5 Reasons Why You Should Keep Geotagging
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(David Kingham) #1

Here’s some perspective from “the other side” where she is clearly placing herself. I’m interested to hear everyone’s thoughts on this.

Please keep the conversation civil and leave politics out of this. I personally feel the author is making a ridiculous stretch making this about racism, but I think there are some points we should at least consider. It’s always good to evaluate thoughts from the other side, otherwise we will never have them on our side.

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About free lunches, or lack thereof
(Alberto Patiño Douce) #2

Count me in as elitist # 1. No, the outdoors are not for everybody to trample on and no, the great cultural and historical treasures of humanity are not for everybody to defile with their idiotic selfies. Yes, “gatekeeping” is needed today more than ever and yes, selfie-stick-wielding imbeciles with check-lists are exactly that: selfie-stick-wielding imbeciles with check-lists.

The sort of people who write and read these articles live for their social media “feeds”. These egocentric narcissists have always made up the same proportion of the human population - evolution does not work that fast. What proportion that is I don’t know, but a perfect storm of ghastly developments has enabled them, over the last decade, to erase all norms of civilized coexistence. One of these developments is social media, but without the sharp decline in the cost of travel (thank discount airlines, airbnb and fracking for that) and a comparably sharp increase in the proportion of affluent humans, these boors would be instagramming their shoe racks and leaving the Earth in peace. There are other contributing factors. An important one is the proliferation of the “Ten Best Places to Go” lists that one can find everywhere, from reputable avenues such as the New York Times and the BBC to polished philistines such as Lonely Planet, stopping along the way at the once-illustrious and now Disneysque National Geographic.

Regrettably, this is only likely to get worse. Most of the people responsible for this tragic state of affairs are beyond reach. Do you think that you can talk a knuckle-dragging miscreant, who is using dogs to corner wildlife in order to get a photo, into not doing that? Or a bunch of loud and frivolous millenials into not taking that selfie sitting on the wildflowers? Or explain to a moron who should know better that no, it is not acceptable to fly a drone when there are other people around enjoying the silence and solitude, or wildlife that can be harmed or disturbed - in fact, that it is never acceptable to fly a drone, period? If you believe that the fraction of people such as these who you will be able to reach is statistically different from zilch, then perhaps you might be interested in a bridge over the East River that I’m selling.

I am sick of it. Where can I sign up for a trip to Mars? A one-way ticket is just fine.

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(Ryan Stikeleather) #3

If you have an opinion—or a message you’re passionate about—it can be misinterpreted by just about anyone. The author of this article is pretty clear about what she believes is the “real” message behind not geotagging a location. I don’t think racism has anything to do with it, but…guess what…that’s my opinion.

Protecting our Public Lands, and our environment, will only work if everyone feels they have a role to play in it.

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(Alan Kreyger) #4

Digital photography (phones) and it’s virtually free cost of entry have forever changed the world. Technology for better or worse has made the world very small and accessible. I have never geotagged and I am not judging those of us who have. But I doubt geotagging or not will make any difference as we move forward. Is there still a spot on the planet that has not been photographed and shared with the masses? That train left the station some time ago. I believe that only with further education of the public will lands be protected. I won’t get into politics, but as with everything, money and politics will drive the solutions…or the lands will not be protected.

As the population increases and the world seems to shrink with technological advancements, I believe that a quota system or some form of controlled access will ultimately be put in place for the most heavily visited places. There will be no choice, the sheer numbers, if unregulated will either destroy these iconic places or make them so miserable to visit that they will lose their attraction and beauty.

The whole geotag racism discussion in the article is a ridiculous contrived stretch IMO.

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(Lon Overacker) #5

Just to lighten things up, this reminded me of something I wrote just over 10 years ago.

Keep in mind this is complete satire. But pretty ingenious if I say so myself…
Posted on April 1st, 2009:

“Quotas on Icon Photography”

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(Preston Birdwell) #6

Exactly this. I could not finish reading the rant, er, article.
-p

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(Alberto Patiño Douce) #7

I studiously avoided the use of the “r” word in my post in order to stress that the problem is with the present day state of human “culture” and attitudes, regardless of ethnic origins. But let me say here that I absolutely agree with your statement. As Preston, I found it almost impossible to get to the end of the “article” without bursting an artery somewhere. But then, what do I know? After all I am a baby boomer European who grew up loving nature.

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(Igor Doncov) #8

Pretty good, Lon. And clever.

What strikes me about the author who considers non-geotaggers as snobs is that she too is not accepting. It’s like saying - we should all love one another and I hate those who don’t.

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(Hank Pennington) #9

Bingo. Vile in fact.

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(Richard Wong) #10

Same here. This popped up in my feed the other day and I stopped after the racism part. That is so offbase here.

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(Josh Latham ) #11

That was a tough read… There were pieces that were aggressively irrational.

That being said, I think the point about pushing Congress to properly fund and staff land management agencies was solid… That’s it, other than that, I feel as though I wasted my time and quite possibly am dumber as a result. :joy:

(Nathan Klein) #12

That article was so ridiculous. I found the writer racist. They almost implied that many white nature lovers are supremacists.

The writer seemed to have no knowledge of how long natural environments take to repair after damage and was I tent on politicising nature access. The point should be nature not access!

(Bob Falcone) #13

I read the entire piece, but the writer lost all credibility by pulling the race card. It’s a cheap stunt and unsubstantiated by any facts. #FAIL

1 Like
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