Sworl

Sworl

It takes a vision to create a photograph. And patience. I saw this leaf that begged to be photographed. It took quite a while as I twisted this way and that to achieve the composition I wanted. This is a one-click image. I saw it in my mind’s eye, then worked and waited until I succeeded to my satisfaction.

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Margo, this is really a great shot. I am quite impressed that you only had to shoot one shot! I would have probably had about 20 on my card when I got through, even though I was pretty sure the first was it, just to be safe. I admire photographers like you that have the vision and know they have the shot, and can move on to other things. Speaking of, back to this beautiful image. I love the composition, the leading line coming down from the top right to the “subject”, the texture, colors, it all works together. Nicely seen and captured, with one click!

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Awesome find and presentation! Unique and compelling image.

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Shirley, I started out photography at 8 having to pay for all my film and developing, so I had to make my dollars count. Even when I turned pro, I was travelling and making stock images. I got paid when usage to the images was leased. That meant, I had to pay up front. It worked for me, as I was fortunate to be published in many international journals and books. But, I had to make each shot count. It is not a bad discipline. It is easier on a tripod, because you can make infinitessible adjustments to get the composition just right for what you want. Besides, if I shoot less, I have less to edit down! :wink: That doesn’t mean that I never work a scene, but mostly, I work it out in my brain and viewfinder before clicking that shutter. One of the exercises I often give our participants is what I call “the one-click wonder.” It makes everyone think more about the shot. After all, photography is a thoughtful process. Thanks for your comments.

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How kind of you, Patricia. I appreciate that! And thank you!

That is some good, sound advice, Margo. I came from the film years as well (not pro, mind you), but now in the digital age, I also shoot a lot of bird photos, and it pays to use the 10 fps to get the shot you are hoping to obtain. So I have probably let that spill over into macro and other types of photography, (more shots are better mindset), rather than spending time watching the scene for distractions, etc. I will try to remember this when I’m out shooting.

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Excellent, but one can even strive for it in bird photography. The more you photograph them, the more you learn about them, and the greater the chance that you will anticipate that qintessential moment. Have fun with this less-is-more approach. It really makes you think. Thanks for this discussion.

Hi Margo. I really like this photograph because it is part of that category of images that, in my opinion, while representing a defined subject, manage to be abstract and raise questions in the viewer. Congratulations.
[sorry grammar, I’m translating with Google Translator :smile: ]

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Germano, tutti bene! e mille grazie. My husband and I always try to interpret a scene rather than record it, so your comments are very much appreciated. I am so glad it spoke to you.

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Germano,

What a great comment. As artists, we hope to provoke the mind into seeing more that is apparently there, to interpreting the scene from one’w own experiences. Thank you!

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