Back country hiking - how do/would you carry your camera/lens?

Heading for 7 days in Colorado back country with a buddy, haven’t done this sort of thing for this many days so trying to figure out the best way to carry my gear. Were not doing an insane amount of hiking, it’s more about keeping it dry and from banging around on anything. Bringing a Z6 with the 14-30, and possibly my 70-200 tamron g2.

Thanks in advance!

For longer hikes like that I carry only my wide angle zoom lens and I have a same camera back for is that just fits the lens and camera. I then use a caribiner to attach it to my backpack or if I’ll be using it frequently I use the caribiner to attach it to a loop on the shoulder strap. The killer is hiking for a week with camera and tripod.

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Sounds like a good trip. In Colorado you are at 1 mile in elevation minimum, likely much higher. Carrying anything and thinking at these elevations is a challenge, even if your in good shape. Weather awareness also helps, it is hail storm season here now, it can become eventful very quickly. GL

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I would highly recommend getting some kind of ICU (internal camera unit) or other padded camera storage. My f-stop (that’s the name of a company) ICU has lasted years. It’s somewhat water resistant, as are backpacks. If I know I am going to be wading through a river or something, I’ll bring a dry bag. All this stuff is heavy and takes up space, but it’s worth it to me.

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Brent is right on, ICU is the way to go. Another option if you want your camera accessible during the hike is a holster like this with a harness works well.

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I would like to use an “official” ICU someday, but for now I have been using old Mountainsmith accessory cases. The accessory cases aren’t as easy to use, but it helps keep things in one place. The one thing I can’t live without is my Peak Design clip. I’ve been using it for years, and I have no idea how I hiked without it before.

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I agree with the ICU/light case advice - something small that will protect your camera but is light enough to not weigh you down - as being a good solution. I have also stuffed camera gear in my sleeping bag compartment or padded it with clothing in the main compartment on multiple occasions and my gear has been fine. The ICU keeps things more organized but also takes up a lot of space, which you might not have for a week-long trip. When I am out backpacking, I also bring a really light daypack - like the REI Flash pack. With that super-light day pack, I can leave the big pack at camp and use the day pack for easier photography around camp. The daypack can also serve as protection if you take the “stuff it in the pack” route. Enjoy your trip!

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I just did a few weeks worth of research on upgrading my camera bag and settled on something similar to the f-stop type setups. Got a Gregory Targhee pack that has rear opening access and then bought an off brand ICU on eBay that fits the pack perfectly. My goal is light weight so i only have my body and a couple lenses, so the ICU i found is much smaller than what you’d be taking up with a lot of the camera specific bags.

All said and done i paid $120 for the whole setup. Note the fabric strap in the way of the icu that i will obviously remove.

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Thank you all so much! It helped a lot. I ended up going with an ICU type thing that can be used as a small sling bag as well for the reason mentioned above - to have a small day back as well. I think it’ll all work out. Awaiting the mail.

Appreciate it all! Definitely nervous for the trip, but going in prepared I hope… Going to be hitting 11k feet, and possibly camping up there. The person I’m going with is experienced, but this will be a first for me of a trip this size.

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